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  • pixeltheatre 12:02 am on June 14, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Asian cuisine, dumplings, potstickers   

    Daring Cooks – 2nd Challenge: Chinese dumplings/potstickers 

    Pan-fired chinese dumplings

    The second Daring Cooks challenge continued with bite-sized wonders in the form of potstickers/chinese dumplings. Our hostess with the mostess this month was Jen from use real butter. Living next to Vancouver’s Chinatown, these dumplings are a familiar sight in small chinese bakeries and restaurants in my neighborhood. I can buy them fresh at Superstore, or  frozen in pretty much every supermarket. It’s almost a staple in this town. Hon‘s is renowned for theirs, and Fujiya also makes very nice gyozas (the japanese version) for take-out. Either, often a treat after a long day’s work.

    We had made various chinese dumplings in cooking school, so this was not a first for me. But, it was a timely reminder of how easy they are to make at home.  The challenge was simple enough: Choose a filling, choose a dough and choose a cooking method.

    I chose the following combination:

    dough:
    2 cups (250g) all-purpose flour
    1/2 cup (113g) warm water
    flour for work surface

    Steamed dumplingsIn a large bowl mix flour with 1/4 cup of water and stir until water is absorbed. Continue adding water one teaspoon at a time and mixing thoroughly until dough pulls away from sides of bowl. We want a firm dough that is barely sticky to the touch. Weighing  ingredients is highly recommended for this recipe.

    Knead the dough about twenty strokes then cover with a damp towel for 15 minutes. Take the dough and form a flattened dome. Cut into strips about 1 1/2 to 2 inches wide. Shape the strips into rounded long cylinders. On a floured surface, cut the strips into 3/4 inch pieces. Press palm down on each piece to form a flat circle (you can shape the corners in with your fingers). With a rolling pin, roll out a circular wrapper from each flat disc. Take care not to roll out too thin or the dumplings will break during cooking – about 1/16th inch. Leave the centers slightly thicker than the edges. Place a tablespoon of filling in the center of each wrapper and fold the dough in half, pleating the edges along one side (see images in post for how to fold pleats). Keep all unused dough under damp cloth.

    pork filling:
    1 lb (450g) ground pork
    4 large napa cabbage leaves, minced
    3 stalks green onions, minced
    7 shitake mushrooms, minced (if dried – rehydrated and rinsed carefully)
    1/2 cup (75g) bamboo shoots, minced
    1/4 (55g) cup ginger root, minced
    3 tbsp (40g) soy sauce
    2 tbsp (28g) sesame oil
    2 tbsp (16g) corn starch

    Combine all filling ingredients in a large mixing bowl and mix thoroughly (I mix by clean hand). Cover and refrigerate until ready to use (up to a day, but preferably within an hour or two).

    and,

    dipping sauce:
    2 parts soy sauce
    1 part vinegar (red wine or black)
    a few drops of sesame oil
    chili garlic paste (optional)
    minced ginger (optional)
    minced garlic (optional)
    minced green onion (optional)
    sugar (optional)

    Prep was typical of many asian dishes, i.e. long with many ingredients involved. Got reacquainted with my chef’s knife (and the importance of keeping it sharpened). But the results were well worth it. The pork filling was just delicious. I had a lot left, which I froze for future dumplings. I steamed some potstickers and pan fried some. I preferred the pan-fried ones, done in a little bit of chili oil. I did not actually boil them either, which gave them a nice hot crunch. The sauce was a great addition as well. My asian pantry is now getting well-stocked, and I’ll be making these savoury nuggets again before long. Great challenge!

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    • Anula 3:31 am on June 14, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Deliciously looking dumplings 🙂 Can I have some? 😉 Great job!

    • Mary 9:39 am on June 14, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Your dumplings look so good. You’ve done a very nice job with the pleating. I hope you have a wonderful day.

    • Jen Yu 11:38 am on June 14, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Oh, lucky you to be near Vancouver! I’m jealous b/c the Chinese food there is *awesome* as you probably know 🙂 But you totally owned this challenge and your potstickers look incredibly tempting now (as I approach lunch hour). Great job!

    • Lauren 8:56 am on June 17, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Beautiful potstickers! Awesome job =D!

  • pixeltheatre 12:02 am on November 1, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Beef rendang, coconut milk, Malaysia,   

    Recipes to Rival – 1st Challenge: Beef Rendang 

    I’ve been looking for a savory version of the monthly Daring Bakers’ challenges for a while. Finally found it on, surprise, one of the DB’s forum threads. Founded by Temperance of High on the Hog and Lori of Lipsmacking Goodness, two DB members, Recipes to Rival launched in June 2008. The format is similar to DB challenges, with different hosts each month. October belonged to birthday girl, Rayrena, from Happy Cows. The inspiration came from a podcast she heard a couple of years ago on The Splendid Table that featured James Oseland, who is now the Editor in Chief of Saveur magazine.

    The recipe was straight forward and mostly involved a slow reduction of beef cubes in coconut milk infused with various traditional Malaysian ingredients: lemongrass, lime leaves, cloves, ginger, galangal, peppers. This gave me a good excuse to visit my favorite spice and exotic food store on Granville Island, South China Seas Trading Co.

    My dinner guest and I were very happy with the results. It was spicy yet creamy. I served it with some Thai sticky rice and pickled carrots and cucumbers. The recipe is available here.

    Looking forward to the November challenge!

     
  • pixeltheatre 10:57 pm on September 27, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , lavash   

    Daring Bakers 11th Challenge: Lavash Crackers 

    We got a reprieve from sweet stuff in this month’s Daring Bakers’ challenge. Our hosts this time around were Natalie from Gluten A Go Go, and Shel, of Musings From the Fishbowl. The challenge was a flatbread called lavash. The additional challenge was to keep everything, including the dip, vegan. It was a nice change to read through the recipe and see I already had all the ingredienst already on hand. A nice change as well was being able to print this recipe on one (1) page!! Something I had yet to see with a DB challenge. 🙂

    The lavash recipe was from Peter Reinhart’s The Bread Baker’s Apprentice. Everything was pretty straightforward. I used zataar as a topping as well as kosher salt and poppy seeds. I used a roasted red pepper dip as an accompaniement. I was happy with the results. Another keeper!

     
    • Joy 12:44 pm on September 28, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      I love the look of those crackers – really authentic.

    • Lynn 3:10 pm on September 28, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Great job! The dip sounds really tasty too!

    • teaandscones 6:25 pm on September 29, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      I love the curly edges on these nice thin crackers. They look really good. Great job.

    • Jorge 10:34 pm on September 30, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Wish u good luck for that competition..

    • Apron Straightjacket 7:07 pm on October 2, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Wonderful job. I love the texture in the surface!

  • pixeltheatre 10:13 pm on June 26, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , cuisine, , nanaimo bar, , , sugar, sweet   

    Mmm…Canada – The Sweet Edition 

    Jennifer (The Domestic Goddess) is hosting this year the Mmm…Canada – The Sweet Edition. In 2005 she asked Canadian bloggers and non-bloggers to talk about their favorite meal, the one that really said Canada to them. This year she decided to up the ante:

    This year let’s make our proverbial pot a little bigger; a little sweeter, if you will. Let’s get together as many bloggers as we can to share their favourite Canadian confection, indulgence, dessert, sweet…anything really! As long as says Canada to you and you can get some sort of Sugar High from it, we want to know about it.

    As mentioned below in the Savoury Edition, I am Québec-born and bred. Quebecers are renowned for their sweet tooth. The dessert that most typifies this for me is Sugar Pie (with a name like that, how can you go wrong?). Tarte au sucre is one of those recipes that offers a lot of variations: maple sugar, brown sugar, flour, no flour, butter or not, cream, etc. Some families guard their version and pass it down generation to generation. I blogged on this last year. The full post can be found here.This entry is the most popular on my site, thanks to an incoming link from Wipedia. I never realized how many people were interested in this dessert…

    Here’s the recipe I usually use. It’s foolproof and quick to prepare.

    Quick Sugar Pie
    (Recipe: courtesy of Mme Paquin, Trois-Rivières)
    1 cup of brown sugar, packed
    1/2 cup whipping cream
    1 tablespoon flour

    Mix ingredients in bowl until smooth. Throw in a frozen pie crust and bake at 400F for 30 minutes. Serve with vanilla ice cream. It tastes even better cold, the day after.

    Now, living on the West Coast, my other favorite sugar high is provided by the Nanaimo Bar.  You can’t beat it for a quick pick-me-up in the afternoon (followed by the inevitable crash). Here’s a recipe from The City of Nanaimo’s website:

    Nanaimo Bar - Stephanie Spencer - Wikipedia Commons Nanaimo Bar Recipe
    Bottom Layer

    • ½ cup unsalted butter (European style cultured)
    • ¼ cup sugar
    • 5 tbsp. cocoa
      1 egg beaten
    • 1 ¼ cups graham wafer crumbs
    • ½ c. finely chopped almonds
    • 1 cup coconut

    Melt first 3 ingredients in top of double boiler. Add egg and stir to cook and thicken. Remove from heat. Stir in crumbs, coconut, and nuts. Press firmly into an ungreased 8″ x 8″ pan.
    Second Layer

    • ½ cup unsalted butter
    • 2 Tbsp. and 2 Tsp. cream
    • 2 Tbsp. vanilla custard powder
    • 2 cups icing sugar

    Cream butter, cream, custard powder, and icing sugar together well. Beat until light. Spread over bottom layer.
    Third Layer

    • 4 squares semi-sweet chocolate (1 oz. each)
    • 2 Tbsp. unsalted butter

    Melt chocolate and butter overlow heat. Cool. Once cool, but still liquid, pour over second layer and chill in refrigerator.

    Note: This dessert/snack also comes in prepackaged mixes for the time-pressed.

    (Photo: Stephanie Spencer, Wikipedia Commons)

     
    • Jennifer 11:55 am on June 28, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Ah, sugar pie…very few things are more Canadian than that! Thanks so much for joining in on Mmm…Canada!

    • Candice 10:18 pm on June 30, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Last time I made sugar pie, it turned out a bit too runny. Next time I’m going to try your recipe! Thanks for sharing it. 🙂

    • madcapCupcake 7:56 am on July 2, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      TWO sweet delights – and both looks delcious 🙂

    • ileygilbert 7:11 pm on July 31, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      oh my gosh these all look amazing!

  • pixeltheatre 9:49 pm on June 26, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , cretons, french canadian, meat pie, , tourtiere   

    Invitation: Mmm…Canada – The Savory Edition 

    In early June I was invited by Jasmine (Confessions of a Cardamon Addict) to blog about “which savory dishes or drinks tastes like Canada to you?” This invitation was in anticipation of July 1st, Canada’s official birthday. It certainly was an interesting question, one I had often thought about, but usually in the context of: Does Canada really have a distinctive culture? Food is definitely part of a culture, I think. But as difficult it is to answer the culture question, the food angle is no easier.

    I was born and raised in Québec, predominantly in the french-canadian culture. I now live on the West Coast of Canada, in Vancouver, a city with distinct Asian and East-Asian culinary influences.  Though I absolutely love that cuisine, and consider it part of my heritage now, I have to admit the first thought and taste that came to me when I received the invitation was my mom’s meat pie (tourtière). I also “smelled” maple sap reducing in a cabane à sucre (sugar shack), and felt the soft, sweet texture of maple taffee on my tongue. All, really, childhood memories.

    Christmas time is a big cooking and baking period pretty much around the world. It’s no exception in Québec. Though my mom now lives in Toronto, I was really happy last Christmas to finally help her prepare a traditional dish, usually served in the winter: Ragoût de pâte de cochon (Pigs feet stew). I blogged about this here. Another traditional fare at that time of year is a type of quick paté called cretons.  It’s a nice little appetizer. Here’s the recipe:

    Cretons à l’ancienne

    Source : Jehane Benoît

    1 lb minced pork, lean
    1 cup milk
    1 cup bread crumbs (or dried bread, finely chopped)
    1 onion, finely chopped
    to taste, Salt
    to taste, Pepper
    to taste, cloves, grounded
    to taste, cinnamon, grounded

    Instructions :Mix all ingredients in a saucepan. Cover and cook for 1 hour on low heat. Stir once or twice during cooking time. Store in containers. Can be frozen.

    Thanks again, Jasmine, for this thought-provoking subject. Now, I wonder, to which cuisine will I turn to celebrate this July 1st?…

     
    • jasmine 4:24 pm on June 27, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Good post. I really enjoy reading about the treats that come from the Québecois kitchen.

      Thanks for participating!

      j

    • Joanne at Frutto della Passione 2:15 am on July 1, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      It is amazing how many of us have talked about childhood memories in our posts for this event. I have never had your dish, but it looks and sounds very tempting! Thanks for sharing.

    • Liliana 10:03 am on July 1, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Mmm…I love cretons although I have never made it. Thanks for sharing this recipe!

      Happy Canada Day!

    • Christine 11:07 am on July 1, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Aaahhh the “sugar shack” smell. I can smell it now. We took our daughter for the first time this year, and hope to do it every year for a long time. I can smell it now. Happy Canada Day!

    • Hélène 6:43 pm on July 3, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Moi aussi je suis née au Québec et j’aime bien les cretons. Que c’est bon.

  • pixeltheatre 5:14 pm on March 5, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Curvware, cutlery, flatware, fork, knife, Knork, ramen spoon, spoon, Zeug Tools   

    Cutlery 2.0 

    Ramen Spoon - MOMACame across this article on Washingtonpost.com today. A Knork in the Road looks into the radical new designs coming down the road, or at least appearing at the upcoming International Home and Housewares Show next week in Chicago.

    Featured will be the Knork, a knife-fork designed by Mike Miller of Kansas. Also, Zeug Tools, based on neanderthal designs (I love that oyster shape spoon), the ergonomically-designed Curvware and the ramen spoon (I want one of those). Jane Black , author of the article, puts these new designs to the test in this video, here.

    Photo: Ramen Spoon. Museum of Modern Art Collection

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  • pixeltheatre 2:06 pm on February 26, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Barilla, Chris Daughtry, , David Tutera, Debra Messing, , Mario Batali, Marisa Tomei, Natalie Portman, Stanley Tucci   

    Free cookbook from Barilla US: Celebrity Italian Table Cookbook 

    BarillaBarilla does it again, this time in support of Second Harvest in the US. The free downloadable pdf includes recipes from Mario Batali, David Tutera, Debra Messing, Stanley Tucci, Natalie Portman, Chris Daughtry and Marisa Tomei.

    So, if Penne in a Spicy Sauce with Capers and Olives, Autumn Vegetables with Goat Cheese and Pumpkinseed Oil and Saffron Panna Cotta sound like your type of Italian delectables, head over to this site to download the book. If you’re from the USA, you can actually specify which Second Harvest you wish Barilla to send its contribution.

    Offer ends February 29th has been extended to March 31st!

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  • pixeltheatre 5:26 pm on February 15, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: chefs, , cooking shows, Cooking videos, restaurants,   

    Cooking videos websites 

    AnswersTV - The Food ChannelCame across a couple of cooking video sites today, courtesy of Ohio.com. The first one is called The Food Channel, part of the larger AnswersTV lifestyle network. Nice series of recipes and tips and tricks free videos. There is also an extensive series with Chefs and restaurants. Quite nice. In addition, you can pair these videos with the Wine Channel, and its  “Wine School”, another free series of videos on wine.

    The second one is Active Cooks. Think of it as the YouTube for aspiring tv chefs. Always wanted to have yourActive Cooks own cooking show? Here’s your platform! There’s a mixture of slick and homespun videos. The site has a little over 170 members and membership is free.

    Take out your pots and pans, get your “mise” ready and let the cameras roll…

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    • cookingciccio 10:41 am on February 22, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      This is just great!!! But if you want to see some good video of cooking italian, just come and visit my blog:

      http://cookingciccio.wordpress.com

      Thanks for this great tips,

      Ciccio

    • cookingciccio 10:44 am on February 22, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      AN other amazing thing!!! The picture on your blog is taken in NY Littel Italy and the Sambuca’s Café is a great friend of mine who’s running it. We are from the same hometown in Sicily. I went there in NY and I just visited him.

      See you on the web

      Ciccio

    • pixeltheatre 3:59 pm on February 22, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Merci Ciccio! And thanks for pinpointing the location of Sambuca. The picture came with the WordPress theme. I cropped it a bit.

      If anyone is interested, here’s the link to information on the restaurant: http://www.littleitalynyc.com/restaurant.asp?rest=SAMBUCAS

    • GaryR 2:52 pm on April 30, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      You have got to check out this new all-video cooking and recipes web site- http://www.inyourkitchen.com

    • Sam 9:29 am on May 13, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Looked at http://www.inyourkitchen.com and that website is really good. I like the way you can see pro chefs cooking in the kitchen. Nice site too, usually cooking websites have too much going on and this one is really easy to find things and is pretty too.

    • Chimena 12:07 pm on May 15, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for sharing the link to http://www.inyourkitchen.com I really like seeing the chefs too and the large video player makes them fun to watch

  • pixeltheatre 6:40 pm on February 13, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Maria Liberati, ,   

    Maria Liberati and The Basic Art of Italian Cooking: Visiting Second Life 

    Maria Liberati - SL Writers Club RoundtableMaria Liberati, former super-model, now celebrity chef, stopped by Athena Isle today, as guest speaker for the Writers Club weekly meeting. She has just launched her second book, The Basic Art of Italian Cooking, available in stores and online at Amazon.

    The format of a roundtable made this particularly enjoyable. Before long, there were quite a few of us sitting around Cybergrrl Oh’s magical table (a new chair appears every time someone sits on one). Maria proved to be very comfortable fielding questions and moving around. Considering this was her first time in Second  Life, I was impressed. We touched on various topics, from the use of fresh ingredients as the key to Italian cooking, to the Slow Food movement, very common in Europe, and now gaining a foothold in North America. Maria explained that her book is not so much a collection of recipes, as a story, or a collection of stories related to various dishes and foods in Italy.

    Maria has a few plans in store, including a podcast and a television series featuring celebrities talking about what they like to eat and favorite recipes. The full transcript of the chat will be available a little later this week on the Second Life Writers Club website. Maria is one of the latest author to make Second Life a stop on a book tour.

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  • pixeltheatre 9:34 pm on January 6, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , meatballs, Pigs's feet stew, , , , tradtional recipe   

    Passing on the tradition…Ragoût de pattes de cochon 

    Ragoût de pattesFinally, with craziness of the holidays behind me, I can settle down once more and get my life back on track. It’s nutty – all this hoopla for one day…

    Although I haven’t contributed much to this blog recently, the holidays were all about baking and cooking for me. I went back East to spend the holidays with my mom. It had been a couple of years since I had been to T.O for the holidays, so it was my turn to make the trek. Luckily the weather cooperated and stayed mild throughout my stay. Despite that, I wasn’t in the mood to confront mobs of people in stores this year. Luckily, my shopping excursions extended to grocery stores. I was determined this year to learn the technique for making Quebec’s traditional stew of “Ragoût de pattes”, or pigs’ feet stew. Since we were hosting the Christmas dinner, it all got rolled into a week of non-stop cooking and baking. It was great!

    The recipe my mom uses as her base for the stew is from Jehane Benoît, a famous Quebec cook. With a few modifications, we came out with this recipe. (Hint: caramelize your onions and hocks until dark brown for a richer sauce).

    Ragoût de pattes de cochon

    1.5 kg pork hocks
    1 tsp Salt
    1/4 tsp Pepper
    1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
    1/4 tsp ground cloves
    1 pinch Nutmeg
    4 tbsp Butter
    4-6 cups Water
    1/2 cube of chicken stock, dissolved in water above
    1 Cup onions, caramelized
    4 tbsp flour, roasted
    1/2 Cup Water

    Instructions :
    1. Season pork hocks with salaison (salt, pepper, ground cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg)
    overnight .
    2. Caramelized onions in a deep saucepan in 2 Tbsp butter. Remove from saucepan.
    3. In same saucepan, melt 2 tbsp butter and sear well pork hocks.
    4. Add water and dissolved chicken stock cube, and onions to pork hocks. Bring to a boil, and then simmer for at least two
    hours, until meat falls from bones.
    5. Remove pork hocks from saucepan and cool overnight in fridge. Remove/skim congealed fat.
    6. Roast flour in oven until caramel brown (350F).
    7. Remove meat from bone and set aside.
    8. Thicken pork hocks liquid with roasted flour until nice thick consistency. Season with
    salt, pepper (and allspice) to taste.
    9. Add cooked pork meatballs and pork meat and heat thoroughly.
    10. Traditionally served with boiled potatoes.

    Pork Meatballs
    1 lb ground pork, lean
    1 Cup Milk
    1 Cup bread crumbs
    3/4 Cup onion, finely chopped
    1/2 Cup celery, finely chopped
    to taste Salt
    to taste Pepper
    to taste Allspice

    Instructions :
    1. Mix milk and bread crumbs well
    2. Add pork, celery and onions. Mix well.
    3. Add seasoning to taste and refrigerate overnight.
    4. Roll mixture into 1-inch meatballs and fry in a bit of butter until 3/4 cooked.
    5. Add to Ragoût de pattes to complete cooking.

    This was one of the best ragoût we ever made. The key being patience in caramelizing your onions and hocks. The flour should also be dark brown, but not burnt. It took us over an hour to get it the right colour in the oven. But it was well worth the wait… 🙂

     
    • Léon Eno 8:03 am on December 12, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      I have been searching for this recipe for so long. I’m in my mid 50’s and my father use to make this once a year but he never wrote down anything, he use to make all the great Quebecqois food and now that he as been gone for over 20 years, I have been drooling to have some of these. The closest thing I’ve found is in Montreal, ‘La Benerie’ on Rue Mont-Royal proche de Rue St Denis, but he wouldn’t share his recipe. If anyone is reading this and has the recipes for the following, I’d be so happy if you would email them to me @ enobdaysetc@gmail.com.
      Tourtiere
      Gortons or Cortons or in english ‘pork scraps’
      Turkey stuffing: Pork, hamburger potatoes & spices, I think their is some clove and or allspice.
      Fèves au lard sans sirop d’érable
      and lastly – Soupe aux pois jaunes

    • Judy 7:34 pm on December 22, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks so much for publishing this recipe. My father’s family was from St David Canada. My mother was Irish but learned to cook this and my Meme said it was better than hers!!! –

      We use to have this every New Years day. My mother never wrote down the recipe but from what I remember this is how my mother made this…..I always remember my mother worried about burning the flour…but she never did.

      I think I may try this for New Years…..

      Thanks again and enjoy your holidays.

    • Margaret 9:24 am on October 13, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      My mother tore the page from her old Ogilvie Chef Royale cookbook to send it to me when I was a young wife years ago… I am simmering my meat on the stove as I write, because the meat was on sale here and I can freeze it ahead and do the flour bit closer to the holidays.

      The smell in my house is sooooo reveillon memory making… Montreal… fur coats…cigarettes going… cold snowy Christmases in the late 1950’s and 60’s…those were the days… The Ogilvie recipe is very similar to yours except the salt is ‘gros sel’ and there is no chicken broth. It is simply water to cover the well-browned (that is the secret! well-browned!) meat.

      Note: To be a little leaner in the pork, these days I mix pork hocks with some cut up lean pork shoulder I have trimmed of all fat. And skimming the liquid as it comes to a boil gives a clearer broth.

      bon appetit! I am so happy to see this online. I remember years ago wanting Canadian Living to feature this recipe and they never did.

    • Marguerite 10:20 pm on January 21, 2013 Permalink | Reply

      I love ragout de pattes! My grandmother used to put farfadelle pasta (the little bowties), and I clearly remember ragout de pattes de cochon being by all time favorite Christmas meal! Thank you for the recipe, though I’m positive that no recipe will ever amount to be as great as my Mamie’s ;).

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