Tagged: ragout de pattes Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • pixeltheatre 9:49 pm on June 26, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , cretons, french canadian, meat pie, ragout de pattes, tourtiere   

    Invitation: Mmm…Canada – The Savory Edition 

    In early June I was invited by Jasmine (Confessions of a Cardamon Addict) to blog about “which savory dishes or drinks tastes like Canada to you?” This invitation was in anticipation of July 1st, Canada’s official birthday. It certainly was an interesting question, one I had often thought about, but usually in the context of: Does Canada really have a distinctive culture? Food is definitely part of a culture, I think. But as difficult it is to answer the culture question, the food angle is no easier.

    I was born and raised in Québec, predominantly in the french-canadian culture. I now live on the West Coast of Canada, in Vancouver, a city with distinct Asian and East-Asian culinary influences.  Though I absolutely love that cuisine, and consider it part of my heritage now, I have to admit the first thought and taste that came to me when I received the invitation was my mom’s meat pie (tourtière). I also “smelled” maple sap reducing in a cabane à sucre (sugar shack), and felt the soft, sweet texture of maple taffee on my tongue. All, really, childhood memories.

    Christmas time is a big cooking and baking period pretty much around the world. It’s no exception in Québec. Though my mom now lives in Toronto, I was really happy last Christmas to finally help her prepare a traditional dish, usually served in the winter: Ragoût de pâte de cochon (Pigs feet stew). I blogged about this here. Another traditional fare at that time of year is a type of quick paté called cretons.  It’s a nice little appetizer. Here’s the recipe:

    Cretons à l’ancienne

    Source : Jehane Benoît

    1 lb minced pork, lean
    1 cup milk
    1 cup bread crumbs (or dried bread, finely chopped)
    1 onion, finely chopped
    to taste, Salt
    to taste, Pepper
    to taste, cloves, grounded
    to taste, cinnamon, grounded

    Instructions :Mix all ingredients in a saucepan. Cover and cook for 1 hour on low heat. Stir once or twice during cooking time. Store in containers. Can be frozen.

    Thanks again, Jasmine, for this thought-provoking subject. Now, I wonder, to which cuisine will I turn to celebrate this July 1st?…

    Advertisements
     
    • jasmine 4:24 pm on June 27, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Good post. I really enjoy reading about the treats that come from the Québecois kitchen.

      Thanks for participating!

      j

    • Joanne at Frutto della Passione 2:15 am on July 1, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      It is amazing how many of us have talked about childhood memories in our posts for this event. I have never had your dish, but it looks and sounds very tempting! Thanks for sharing.

    • Liliana 10:03 am on July 1, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Mmm…I love cretons although I have never made it. Thanks for sharing this recipe!

      Happy Canada Day!

    • Christine 11:07 am on July 1, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Aaahhh the “sugar shack” smell. I can smell it now. We took our daughter for the first time this year, and hope to do it every year for a long time. I can smell it now. Happy Canada Day!

    • Hélène 6:43 pm on July 3, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Moi aussi je suis née au Québec et j’aime bien les cretons. Que c’est bon.

  • pixeltheatre 9:34 pm on January 6, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , meatballs, Pigs's feet stew, , , ragout de pattes, tradtional recipe   

    Passing on the tradition…Ragoût de pattes de cochon 

    Ragoût de pattesFinally, with craziness of the holidays behind me, I can settle down once more and get my life back on track. It’s nutty – all this hoopla for one day…

    Although I haven’t contributed much to this blog recently, the holidays were all about baking and cooking for me. I went back East to spend the holidays with my mom. It had been a couple of years since I had been to T.O for the holidays, so it was my turn to make the trek. Luckily the weather cooperated and stayed mild throughout my stay. Despite that, I wasn’t in the mood to confront mobs of people in stores this year. Luckily, my shopping excursions extended to grocery stores. I was determined this year to learn the technique for making Quebec’s traditional stew of “Ragoût de pattes”, or pigs’ feet stew. Since we were hosting the Christmas dinner, it all got rolled into a week of non-stop cooking and baking. It was great!

    The recipe my mom uses as her base for the stew is from Jehane Benoît, a famous Quebec cook. With a few modifications, we came out with this recipe. (Hint: caramelize your onions and hocks until dark brown for a richer sauce).

    Ragoût de pattes de cochon

    1.5 kg pork hocks
    1 tsp Salt
    1/4 tsp Pepper
    1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
    1/4 tsp ground cloves
    1 pinch Nutmeg
    4 tbsp Butter
    4-6 cups Water
    1/2 cube of chicken stock, dissolved in water above
    1 Cup onions, caramelized
    4 tbsp flour, roasted
    1/2 Cup Water

    Instructions :
    1. Season pork hocks with salaison (salt, pepper, ground cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg)
    overnight .
    2. Caramelized onions in a deep saucepan in 2 Tbsp butter. Remove from saucepan.
    3. In same saucepan, melt 2 tbsp butter and sear well pork hocks.
    4. Add water and dissolved chicken stock cube, and onions to pork hocks. Bring to a boil, and then simmer for at least two
    hours, until meat falls from bones.
    5. Remove pork hocks from saucepan and cool overnight in fridge. Remove/skim congealed fat.
    6. Roast flour in oven until caramel brown (350F).
    7. Remove meat from bone and set aside.
    8. Thicken pork hocks liquid with roasted flour until nice thick consistency. Season with
    salt, pepper (and allspice) to taste.
    9. Add cooked pork meatballs and pork meat and heat thoroughly.
    10. Traditionally served with boiled potatoes.

    Pork Meatballs
    1 lb ground pork, lean
    1 Cup Milk
    1 Cup bread crumbs
    3/4 Cup onion, finely chopped
    1/2 Cup celery, finely chopped
    to taste Salt
    to taste Pepper
    to taste Allspice

    Instructions :
    1. Mix milk and bread crumbs well
    2. Add pork, celery and onions. Mix well.
    3. Add seasoning to taste and refrigerate overnight.
    4. Roll mixture into 1-inch meatballs and fry in a bit of butter until 3/4 cooked.
    5. Add to Ragoût de pattes to complete cooking.

    This was one of the best ragoût we ever made. The key being patience in caramelizing your onions and hocks. The flour should also be dark brown, but not burnt. It took us over an hour to get it the right colour in the oven. But it was well worth the wait… 🙂

     
    • Léon Eno 8:03 am on December 12, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      I have been searching for this recipe for so long. I’m in my mid 50’s and my father use to make this once a year but he never wrote down anything, he use to make all the great Quebecqois food and now that he as been gone for over 20 years, I have been drooling to have some of these. The closest thing I’ve found is in Montreal, ‘La Benerie’ on Rue Mont-Royal proche de Rue St Denis, but he wouldn’t share his recipe. If anyone is reading this and has the recipes for the following, I’d be so happy if you would email them to me @ enobdaysetc@gmail.com.
      Tourtiere
      Gortons or Cortons or in english ‘pork scraps’
      Turkey stuffing: Pork, hamburger potatoes & spices, I think their is some clove and or allspice.
      Fèves au lard sans sirop d’érable
      and lastly – Soupe aux pois jaunes

    • Judy 7:34 pm on December 22, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks so much for publishing this recipe. My father’s family was from St David Canada. My mother was Irish but learned to cook this and my Meme said it was better than hers!!! –

      We use to have this every New Years day. My mother never wrote down the recipe but from what I remember this is how my mother made this…..I always remember my mother worried about burning the flour…but she never did.

      I think I may try this for New Years…..

      Thanks again and enjoy your holidays.

    • Margaret 9:24 am on October 13, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      My mother tore the page from her old Ogilvie Chef Royale cookbook to send it to me when I was a young wife years ago… I am simmering my meat on the stove as I write, because the meat was on sale here and I can freeze it ahead and do the flour bit closer to the holidays.

      The smell in my house is sooooo reveillon memory making… Montreal… fur coats…cigarettes going… cold snowy Christmases in the late 1950’s and 60’s…those were the days… The Ogilvie recipe is very similar to yours except the salt is ‘gros sel’ and there is no chicken broth. It is simply water to cover the well-browned (that is the secret! well-browned!) meat.

      Note: To be a little leaner in the pork, these days I mix pork hocks with some cut up lean pork shoulder I have trimmed of all fat. And skimming the liquid as it comes to a boil gives a clearer broth.

      bon appetit! I am so happy to see this online. I remember years ago wanting Canadian Living to feature this recipe and they never did.

    • Marguerite 10:20 pm on January 21, 2013 Permalink | Reply

      I love ragout de pattes! My grandmother used to put farfadelle pasta (the little bowties), and I clearly remember ragout de pattes de cochon being by all time favorite Christmas meal! Thank you for the recipe, though I’m positive that no recipe will ever amount to be as great as my Mamie’s ;).

c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel