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  • pixeltheatre 12:01 am on January 14, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: pork, satay, thai   

    Daring Cooks 9th Challenge: Pork Satay 

    The January 2010 DC challenge was hosted by Cuppy of Cuppylicious and she chose a delicious Thai-inspired recipe for Pork Satay from the book 1000 Recipes by Martha Day. The main challenge of this dish was the marinating of the meat. I opted for the traditional marinade and chose pork as the meat. The weather was nice and mild this year, perfect for a charcoal bbq. So we kicked off the new year with pork bbq satay. A nice and relaxed way to celebrate a new decade of, what I hope will be, many more cooking and baking challenges.

    Pork Satay with Peanut Sauce

    Satay Marinade

    1/2 small onion, chopped
    2 garlic cloves, crushed
    1 T ginger root, chopped (optional) (2 cm cubed)
    2 T lemon juice (1 oz or 30 mls)
    1 T soy sauce (0.5 oz or 15 mls)
    1 tsp ground coriander (5 mls)
    1 tsp ground cumin (5 mls)
    1/2 tsp ground turmeric (2-2.5 mls)
    2 T vegetable oil (or peanut or olive oil) (30 mls)
    1 pound of pork (loin or shoulder cuts) (16 oz or 450g)

    Feeling the need to make it more Thai? Try adding a dragon chili, an extra tablespoon of ginger root, and 1 tablespoon (0.5 oz or 15 mls) of fish sauce. (I keep some premature (still green) dragon chili peppers in the freezer for just such an occasion.)

    Directions:
    1a. Cheater alert: If you have a food processor or blender, dump in everything except the pork and blend until smooth. Lacking a food processor, I prefer to chop my onions, garlic and ginger really fine then mix it all together in a medium to large bowl.
    2a. Cut pork into 1 inch strips.
    3a. Cover pork with marinade. You can place the pork into a bowl, cover/seal and chill, or place the whole lot of it into a ziplock bag, seal and chill.


    Chill Chart

    Pork Beef/Lamb Chicken Vegetables Tofu (no oil)
    4-8 hrs
    Up to 24 hrs
    6-8 hrs
    Up to 24 hrs
    1-4 hours
    Up to 12 hrs
    20 min – 2 hrs
    Up to 4 hrs
    20 min – 4 hrs
    Up to 12 hrs

    Faster (cheaper!) marinade:

    2 T vegetable oil (or peanut or olive oil) (1 oz or 30 mls)
    2 T lemon juice (1 oz or 30 mls)
    1 T soy sauce (0.5 oz or 15 mls)
    1 tsp ginger powder (5 mls)
    1 tsp garlic powder (5 mls)
    1 tsp cayenne pepper (5 mls)

    Directions:
    1b. Mix well.
    2b. Cut pork into 1 inch thick strips (2-2.5 cm thick), any length.
    3b. Cover pork with marinade. You can place the pork into a bowl, cover/seal and chill, or place the whole lot of it into a ziplock bag, seal and chill.

    Cooking Directions (continued):

    4. If using wooden or bamboo skewers, soak your skewers in warm water for at least 20 minutes before preparing skewers.
    5. Gently and slowly slide meat strips onto skewers. Discard leftover marinade.*
    6. Broil or grill at 290°C/550° F (or pan fry on medium-high) for 8-10 minutes or until the edges just start to char. Flip and cook another 8-10 minutes.

    • If you’re grilling or broiling, you could definitely brush once with extra marinade when you flip the skewers.

    Peanut Sauce

    3/4 cup coconut milk (6 oz or 180 mls)
    4 Tbsp peanut butter (2 oz or 60 mls)
    1 Tbsp lemon juice (0.5 oz or 15 mls)
    1 Tbsp soy sauce (0.5 oz or 15 mls)
    1 tsp brown sugar (5 mls)
    1/2 tsp ground cumin (2.5 mls)
    1/2 tsp ground coriander (2.5 mls)
    1-2 dried red chilies, chopped (keep the seeds for heat)

    1. Mix dry ingredients in a small bowl. Add soy sauce and lemon, mix well.
    2. Over low heat, combine coconut milk, peanut butter and your soy-lemon-seasoning mix. Mix well, stir often.
    3. All you’re doing is melting the peanut butter, so make your peanut sauce after you’ve made everything else in your meal, or make ahead of time and reheat.

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    • Frenchie 1:26 pm on January 14, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I would have loved to barbecue my satay to get that nice char on it, too bad I live in Montreal, where the brutally cold whether would not permit that. I am sure your satay was delicious.

    • Audax Artifex 1:50 am on January 15, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Love that 2nd photo and the purple flame coming though. Great you liked it so much. In Australia it was 40C so so so hot LOL LOL LOL. Cheers from Audax in Sydney Australia.

  • pixeltheatre 9:34 pm on January 6, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , meatballs, Pigs's feet stew, pork, , , tradtional recipe   

    Passing on the tradition…Ragoût de pattes de cochon 

    Ragoût de pattesFinally, with craziness of the holidays behind me, I can settle down once more and get my life back on track. It’s nutty – all this hoopla for one day…

    Although I haven’t contributed much to this blog recently, the holidays were all about baking and cooking for me. I went back East to spend the holidays with my mom. It had been a couple of years since I had been to T.O for the holidays, so it was my turn to make the trek. Luckily the weather cooperated and stayed mild throughout my stay. Despite that, I wasn’t in the mood to confront mobs of people in stores this year. Luckily, my shopping excursions extended to grocery stores. I was determined this year to learn the technique for making Quebec’s traditional stew of “Ragoût de pattes”, or pigs’ feet stew. Since we were hosting the Christmas dinner, it all got rolled into a week of non-stop cooking and baking. It was great!

    The recipe my mom uses as her base for the stew is from Jehane Benoît, a famous Quebec cook. With a few modifications, we came out with this recipe. (Hint: caramelize your onions and hocks until dark brown for a richer sauce).

    Ragoût de pattes de cochon

    1.5 kg pork hocks
    1 tsp Salt
    1/4 tsp Pepper
    1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
    1/4 tsp ground cloves
    1 pinch Nutmeg
    4 tbsp Butter
    4-6 cups Water
    1/2 cube of chicken stock, dissolved in water above
    1 Cup onions, caramelized
    4 tbsp flour, roasted
    1/2 Cup Water

    Instructions :
    1. Season pork hocks with salaison (salt, pepper, ground cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg)
    overnight .
    2. Caramelized onions in a deep saucepan in 2 Tbsp butter. Remove from saucepan.
    3. In same saucepan, melt 2 tbsp butter and sear well pork hocks.
    4. Add water and dissolved chicken stock cube, and onions to pork hocks. Bring to a boil, and then simmer for at least two
    hours, until meat falls from bones.
    5. Remove pork hocks from saucepan and cool overnight in fridge. Remove/skim congealed fat.
    6. Roast flour in oven until caramel brown (350F).
    7. Remove meat from bone and set aside.
    8. Thicken pork hocks liquid with roasted flour until nice thick consistency. Season with
    salt, pepper (and allspice) to taste.
    9. Add cooked pork meatballs and pork meat and heat thoroughly.
    10. Traditionally served with boiled potatoes.

    Pork Meatballs
    1 lb ground pork, lean
    1 Cup Milk
    1 Cup bread crumbs
    3/4 Cup onion, finely chopped
    1/2 Cup celery, finely chopped
    to taste Salt
    to taste Pepper
    to taste Allspice

    Instructions :
    1. Mix milk and bread crumbs well
    2. Add pork, celery and onions. Mix well.
    3. Add seasoning to taste and refrigerate overnight.
    4. Roll mixture into 1-inch meatballs and fry in a bit of butter until 3/4 cooked.
    5. Add to Ragoût de pattes to complete cooking.

    This was one of the best ragoût we ever made. The key being patience in caramelizing your onions and hocks. The flour should also be dark brown, but not burnt. It took us over an hour to get it the right colour in the oven. But it was well worth the wait… 🙂

     
    • Léon Eno 8:03 am on December 12, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      I have been searching for this recipe for so long. I’m in my mid 50’s and my father use to make this once a year but he never wrote down anything, he use to make all the great Quebecqois food and now that he as been gone for over 20 years, I have been drooling to have some of these. The closest thing I’ve found is in Montreal, ‘La Benerie’ on Rue Mont-Royal proche de Rue St Denis, but he wouldn’t share his recipe. If anyone is reading this and has the recipes for the following, I’d be so happy if you would email them to me @ enobdaysetc@gmail.com.
      Tourtiere
      Gortons or Cortons or in english ‘pork scraps’
      Turkey stuffing: Pork, hamburger potatoes & spices, I think their is some clove and or allspice.
      Fèves au lard sans sirop d’érable
      and lastly – Soupe aux pois jaunes

    • Judy 7:34 pm on December 22, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks so much for publishing this recipe. My father’s family was from St David Canada. My mother was Irish but learned to cook this and my Meme said it was better than hers!!! –

      We use to have this every New Years day. My mother never wrote down the recipe but from what I remember this is how my mother made this…..I always remember my mother worried about burning the flour…but she never did.

      I think I may try this for New Years…..

      Thanks again and enjoy your holidays.

    • Margaret 9:24 am on October 13, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      My mother tore the page from her old Ogilvie Chef Royale cookbook to send it to me when I was a young wife years ago… I am simmering my meat on the stove as I write, because the meat was on sale here and I can freeze it ahead and do the flour bit closer to the holidays.

      The smell in my house is sooooo reveillon memory making… Montreal… fur coats…cigarettes going… cold snowy Christmases in the late 1950’s and 60’s…those were the days… The Ogilvie recipe is very similar to yours except the salt is ‘gros sel’ and there is no chicken broth. It is simply water to cover the well-browned (that is the secret! well-browned!) meat.

      Note: To be a little leaner in the pork, these days I mix pork hocks with some cut up lean pork shoulder I have trimmed of all fat. And skimming the liquid as it comes to a boil gives a clearer broth.

      bon appetit! I am so happy to see this online. I remember years ago wanting Canadian Living to feature this recipe and they never did.

    • Marguerite 10:20 pm on January 21, 2013 Permalink | Reply

      I love ragout de pattes! My grandmother used to put farfadelle pasta (the little bowties), and I clearly remember ragout de pattes de cochon being by all time favorite Christmas meal! Thank you for the recipe, though I’m positive that no recipe will ever amount to be as great as my Mamie’s ;).

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