Updates from January, 2008 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • pixeltheatre 12:01 am on January 28, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Lemon, ,   

    Daring Bakers – 4th Challenge: Lemon Meringue Pie 

    Lemon Meringue PieMy baking activities abruptly fell off after the holidays. I realized that I simply can’t eat everything I bake, and so a lot of it goes to waste. As much as a lot of the challenges out there are enticing, I just can’t afford to address most of them. However, one I will never miss is the Daring Bakers challenge. This month’s recipe was a particularly refreshing one: Lemon Meringue Pie.

    Our  January hostess was Jen, from The Canadian Baker. I was thrilled I was going to get a chance to make a custard once more. After my Bostini massacre, I needed that boost in confidence, even though the recipe was quite different for this custard.

    As most DB recipes, this one was a multi-step process. To break it up, I prepared the pastry the night before and let it rest in the fridge overnight. We had done pâte brisée a few times in cooking school. The process of gently kneading the flour and butter together brings fond memories of Chef Tony reminding us the importance of safekeeping these pockets of butter amidst the flour. That’s what creates the flakiness of the crust. There is a particular expression used to describe this process: fraisage. I was happy with the resulting crust.

    The custard process was straightforward and reminded me of the freshness of lemon. I especially Lemon Meringue Pie sliceappreciated that this recipe did not leave any unused egg whites – they ended up in the meringue. Thanks to my mother’s gift of a gorgeous KitchenAid mixer, that was done in a snap. I had never sealed a pie with meringue before, but I just love the look of it.That’s a technique I’ll definitely use again.

    Another winner of a recipe!

    Advertisements
     
    • Dolores 12:37 am on January 28, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Great job! I love the tales of your time with Chef Tony. And I’m with you on the egg whites… after the last few challenges I was growing weary of egg white omelettes. 🙂

    • sher 1:32 am on January 28, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Oh, I feel so inadequate! Your pie looks marvelous–the way you did the meringue is splendid.

    • Pixie 2:16 am on January 28, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Looks great, well done!

    • Rosa 3:26 am on January 28, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Your pie looks really great! Good job!

      Cheers,

      Rosa

    • Babeth 5:13 am on January 28, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      congratulations my “daring friend” your pie looks very yummy!!

    • Katia 7:18 am on January 28, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Hi, Your pie looks great! I like the circular design on the meringue.

    • Aparna 8:19 am on January 28, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Your pie looks good. I especially liked the design on the meringue, a nice change from the “hedgehoggy” look.:)

    • Amber 8:38 am on January 28, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Your pie looks wonderful. Congratulations on the sucessful challenge.

    • culinography 12:20 pm on January 28, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Looks wonderful! Great job on this month’s challenge!

    • Adriana 1:37 pm on January 28, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Excellent job!!! your pie it’s beatiful!!!

      Congratulations! 🙂

    • Tina 4:04 pm on January 28, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Great job!! I love the spiral of your meringue. It looks amazing!

    • Iisha 4:51 pm on January 28, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Looking great… good job.

      Iisha

    • breadchick 7:04 pm on January 28, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Nice job on your challenge! The right mixer sure helps with some tasks doesn’t it!!

    • Jess 12:35 am on January 29, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Nice swirls and lovely thick lemon curd

    • Big Boys Oven 1:39 am on January 29, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      such a huge pie…. we love it and not hate but adore it, well done!

    • Deborah 8:49 am on January 29, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Your pie looks wonderful! I love the swirls on your meringue.

    • Maryann 1:57 pm on January 29, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      The meringue spiral is hypnotizing me! haha. Great job you!

    • Kaykat 6:10 pm on January 29, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Yum! The lemon curd looks perfect!

    • Lisa 11:42 pm on January 29, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Looks great, good job 🙂

    • Ivonne 1:57 pm on January 30, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Well done! Your meringue is so nicely browned!

    • acupofjoy 12:24 am on January 31, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Your lemon curd looks lovely! Wonderful!

    • Jenny 6:00 am on January 31, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Your meringue swirl draws you in, saying EAT ME!! 🙂

    • Jen 10:57 am on January 31, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Great job on your LMP – it looks beautiful and the filling held up perfectly 🙂

    • Claire 6:38 pm on January 31, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Great swirly meringue. Glad you don’t skip out on the DB challenges. You just need to find a group of friends to be tasters for you…that’s what I do! (or family!) 🙂

    • Jessica 9:33 am on February 2, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Your meringue is so unique looking! Great job!

  • pixeltheatre 3:19 pm on January 16, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Epicurious, fight hunger, , , NFL, , Superbowl, vote   

    Taste of the NFL and Epicurious: Wine, Dine, Donate 

    With Superbowl XLII just around the corner (Feb. 3rd), the NFL is expanding its generosity by participating in Epicurious’ Wine, Dine, Donate program.

    One recipe has been collected from noted players from each team. Vote on your favorite recipe and Epicurious will donate $1 to fight hunger. Click on logo below to go to site.

    Taste of the NFL

    AddThis Social Bookmark Button

     
  • pixeltheatre 6:00 am on January 7, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Hotel Chocolat, truffles   

    And the winner is… 

    Sometime in early December, as I was perusing the Daring Bakers website, I noticed an ad on the site for a Pink Champagne Truffleschocolate competition hosted by Hotel Chocolat, a UK-based purveyor of fine chocolates. The deal was simple: Submit your favorite chocolate-based recipe and their panel would pick a winner.

    My all-time favorite and most acclaimed recipe is for Santa Fe Brownies, an unctuous concoction of 12 ounces of chocolate (bittersweet and semi-sweet) and cream cheese. I can’t quite recall how I got hold of this recipe. I believe my mom gave it to me, but she can’t remember where she got it from. It took me all of 2 minutes to copy my recipe onto the site’s registration and to submit it. Needless to say, I was dumbfounded when I received an email, from the marketing company behind the contest, telling me I had won! :0

    Shortly after Christmas, I received my prizes: a box of Pink Champagne Truffles and a copy of the 101 Best Loved  Chocolate Recipes Book. The truffles are to die for, and the book is chock-full of scrumptious recipes (chocolate pasta anyone?…). Thank you Hotel Chocolat! It was a very nice after-Christmas present.

    I baked Santa Fe Brownies while at my mother’s over the holidays. Our guests at Christmas all got to take a slab home. That recipe is definitely a winner in everyone’s book. Here’s the recipe. It’s a little-time consuming, but well worth the effort.

    Santa Fe BrowniesSanta Fe Brownies
    1 cup plus 1 teaspoon butter
    6 squares (6 ounces) unsweetened chocolate coarsely chopped
    6 squares (6 ounces) semisweet chocolate, coarsely chopped
    1 _ cups all-purpose flour
    1 _ teaspoons baking powder
    3/4 teaspoon salt
    5 large eggs
    1 _ cups firmly packed brown sugar
    1 1/4 cups granulated sugar
    1 tablespoon vanilla extract
    1 _ cups walnuts, broken into large pieces

    Cream Cheese Mixture
    12 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature
    6 tablespoons butter, softened (no substitutions)
    1 _ teaspoons vanilla extract
    3/4 cup granulated sugar
    3 large eggs

    Instructions :
    1.Preheat oven to 350 F. Line a 13x 9 inch baking pan with foil.   Melt 1 teaspoon of the
    butter and brush the bottom and sides of the pan with it.  Melt the unsweetened
    chocolate, semisweet chocolate, and the remaining 1 cup of butter in top of a double
    boiler over simmering water.  Set mixture aside and cool slightly.

    2.  Stir together the flour, baking powder, and salt in a medium bowl.  Beat the eggs in a
    large mixing bowl at medium speed until just blended.  Add the brown sugar, granulated
    sugar, and vanilla: beat just until smooth.  Beat in the chocolate mixture, then flour
    mixture, at low speed just until combined.  Reserve 2 1/4 cups batter.  Stir the walnuts
    into remaining batter in the mixing bowl.  Spread the batter in the prepared pan.

    3.  For Cream Cheese Mixture, beat the cream cheese and butter in a clean mixing bowl
    at medium speed until smooth.  Gradually beat in the vanilla and sugar until light and
    fluffy.  Add the eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition and beat just until
    smooth.  Spoon the mixture over the chocolate batter in prepared pan, spreading to
    edges to the pan.

    4.Stir reserved chocolate batter to soften.  Spoon the batter over the cream cheese
    layer.  With a knife, cut through batters in a zigzag pattern to marbleize slightly.  Bake 1
    hour 15 minutes , until toothpick inserted in center comes out barely clean.  (If the top
    browns too quickly during baking, cover the pan loosely with foil.)  Cool completely in the
    pan on a wire rack.  Invert onto a cookie sheet; gently lift off pan and remove foil.  Invert
    again, cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.

    5.  With a long, sharp knife, cut brownies into squares, then cut each quarter into 8
    squares.  (Can also be cut into slabs and frozen.) Makes 32.

    Enjoy!

    AddThis Social Bookmark Button

     
    • Annemarie 2:59 am on February 29, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Oh, well done! I think it was me who posted the contest. I never learned who the winner was for this contest so I’m pleased to hear it went to a worth candidate!

    • naomi 2:54 am on March 12, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Fantastic, well done! Those brownies look incredible!

  • pixeltheatre 9:34 pm on January 6, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , meatballs, Pigs's feet stew, , , , tradtional recipe   

    Passing on the tradition…Ragoût de pattes de cochon 

    Ragoût de pattesFinally, with craziness of the holidays behind me, I can settle down once more and get my life back on track. It’s nutty – all this hoopla for one day…

    Although I haven’t contributed much to this blog recently, the holidays were all about baking and cooking for me. I went back East to spend the holidays with my mom. It had been a couple of years since I had been to T.O for the holidays, so it was my turn to make the trek. Luckily the weather cooperated and stayed mild throughout my stay. Despite that, I wasn’t in the mood to confront mobs of people in stores this year. Luckily, my shopping excursions extended to grocery stores. I was determined this year to learn the technique for making Quebec’s traditional stew of “Ragoût de pattes”, or pigs’ feet stew. Since we were hosting the Christmas dinner, it all got rolled into a week of non-stop cooking and baking. It was great!

    The recipe my mom uses as her base for the stew is from Jehane Benoît, a famous Quebec cook. With a few modifications, we came out with this recipe. (Hint: caramelize your onions and hocks until dark brown for a richer sauce).

    Ragoût de pattes de cochon

    1.5 kg pork hocks
    1 tsp Salt
    1/4 tsp Pepper
    1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
    1/4 tsp ground cloves
    1 pinch Nutmeg
    4 tbsp Butter
    4-6 cups Water
    1/2 cube of chicken stock, dissolved in water above
    1 Cup onions, caramelized
    4 tbsp flour, roasted
    1/2 Cup Water

    Instructions :
    1. Season pork hocks with salaison (salt, pepper, ground cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg)
    overnight .
    2. Caramelized onions in a deep saucepan in 2 Tbsp butter. Remove from saucepan.
    3. In same saucepan, melt 2 tbsp butter and sear well pork hocks.
    4. Add water and dissolved chicken stock cube, and onions to pork hocks. Bring to a boil, and then simmer for at least two
    hours, until meat falls from bones.
    5. Remove pork hocks from saucepan and cool overnight in fridge. Remove/skim congealed fat.
    6. Roast flour in oven until caramel brown (350F).
    7. Remove meat from bone and set aside.
    8. Thicken pork hocks liquid with roasted flour until nice thick consistency. Season with
    salt, pepper (and allspice) to taste.
    9. Add cooked pork meatballs and pork meat and heat thoroughly.
    10. Traditionally served with boiled potatoes.

    Pork Meatballs
    1 lb ground pork, lean
    1 Cup Milk
    1 Cup bread crumbs
    3/4 Cup onion, finely chopped
    1/2 Cup celery, finely chopped
    to taste Salt
    to taste Pepper
    to taste Allspice

    Instructions :
    1. Mix milk and bread crumbs well
    2. Add pork, celery and onions. Mix well.
    3. Add seasoning to taste and refrigerate overnight.
    4. Roll mixture into 1-inch meatballs and fry in a bit of butter until 3/4 cooked.
    5. Add to Ragoût de pattes to complete cooking.

    This was one of the best ragoût we ever made. The key being patience in caramelizing your onions and hocks. The flour should also be dark brown, but not burnt. It took us over an hour to get it the right colour in the oven. But it was well worth the wait… 🙂

     
    • Léon Eno 8:03 am on December 12, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      I have been searching for this recipe for so long. I’m in my mid 50’s and my father use to make this once a year but he never wrote down anything, he use to make all the great Quebecqois food and now that he as been gone for over 20 years, I have been drooling to have some of these. The closest thing I’ve found is in Montreal, ‘La Benerie’ on Rue Mont-Royal proche de Rue St Denis, but he wouldn’t share his recipe. If anyone is reading this and has the recipes for the following, I’d be so happy if you would email them to me @ enobdaysetc@gmail.com.
      Tourtiere
      Gortons or Cortons or in english ‘pork scraps’
      Turkey stuffing: Pork, hamburger potatoes & spices, I think their is some clove and or allspice.
      Fèves au lard sans sirop d’érable
      and lastly – Soupe aux pois jaunes

    • Judy 7:34 pm on December 22, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks so much for publishing this recipe. My father’s family was from St David Canada. My mother was Irish but learned to cook this and my Meme said it was better than hers!!! –

      We use to have this every New Years day. My mother never wrote down the recipe but from what I remember this is how my mother made this…..I always remember my mother worried about burning the flour…but she never did.

      I think I may try this for New Years…..

      Thanks again and enjoy your holidays.

    • Margaret 9:24 am on October 13, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      My mother tore the page from her old Ogilvie Chef Royale cookbook to send it to me when I was a young wife years ago… I am simmering my meat on the stove as I write, because the meat was on sale here and I can freeze it ahead and do the flour bit closer to the holidays.

      The smell in my house is sooooo reveillon memory making… Montreal… fur coats…cigarettes going… cold snowy Christmases in the late 1950’s and 60’s…those were the days… The Ogilvie recipe is very similar to yours except the salt is ‘gros sel’ and there is no chicken broth. It is simply water to cover the well-browned (that is the secret! well-browned!) meat.

      Note: To be a little leaner in the pork, these days I mix pork hocks with some cut up lean pork shoulder I have trimmed of all fat. And skimming the liquid as it comes to a boil gives a clearer broth.

      bon appetit! I am so happy to see this online. I remember years ago wanting Canadian Living to feature this recipe and they never did.

    • Marguerite 10:20 pm on January 21, 2013 Permalink | Reply

      I love ragout de pattes! My grandmother used to put farfadelle pasta (the little bowties), and I clearly remember ragout de pattes de cochon being by all time favorite Christmas meal! Thank you for the recipe, though I’m positive that no recipe will ever amount to be as great as my Mamie’s ;).

c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel